The Barefoot Warrior

The Journey of a Young Adult in Search of His True Nature

by Kyle Weaver

The Barefoot Warrior
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The Barefoot Warrior

The Journey of a Young Adult in Search of His True Nature

by Kyle Weaver

Published Feb 29, 2012
223 Pages
Genre: FICTION / Coming of Age



 

Book Details

To dream a life… Or live a dream?

“This is the end of my life as I’ve known it. I can’t spend another day playing the sidekick in other people’s stories. I can’t keep trusting the advice or expectations of adults who lack the time and interest to see me for who I am and what I care about. I will not argue anymore about why my dreams are valid. Today, I step forward on my own path into the unknown without a backward thought. If I get crushed, so be it. At least I’ll know what it means to be the keeper of my own destiny.” With these thoughts, 16 year-old Kyle Weaver breaks free from foster care and public education to set out on the path of his own greatness. What follows are the trials of a modern-day hero’s journey. The Barefoot Warrior explores a universal human yearning for liberation and fulfillment that is shared by people young and old throughout the world. This book offers a fresh and youthful perspective on the social and educational problems that society faces today.

 

Book Excerpt

Chapter 3: The Problem with Adults Journal Entry #2, August twenty-eighth, 12:45 p.m. You ever take a piss off a cliff? It’s the trippiest thing. Day after day you get used to the same ritual, right? Holding it however you hold it, then easing into a nice, relaxed piss. There’s that splashing sound in the toilet that always sounds a little too loud for what’s actually happening, but it’s nice, because somehow it makes you relax even more and the piss really starts streaming. Pissing off a cliff is the strangest thing because the sound never comes. You watch the stream go and go. The sound never comes. It’s liberating in some ways. Maybe it’s the breeze against your crotch. Who knows. But there’s a certain payoff that never comes. Talking to adults is a lot like pissing off a cliff. First of all, talking to them about anything that matters is about as comfortable as it would be standing with them right there, shorts down around your thighs, trying to unburden you bladder. But the part that’s really similar is the part about pissing out into a vast emptiness, waiting for a payoff that’ll never come. The problem with adults is that they have very few useful comments when it comes to a problem you’re having. They never seem to understand what you’re saying, so when you talk to them, they try to change your problem into something they do understand. Something they have advice for. Or they try to convince you that your problem isn’t really a problem, thus avoiding the inevitable crash-and-burn advice experience altogether. Bottom line is, they’re not thinking about the "you" in your problem. They’re thinking about what they can or can’t do about the problem, cuz they think that’s their job. All you adults out there, especially you, Mr.vice Principal, listen: that’s not your job. We’re not looking for something your grandpa said thirty years ago. We’re looking to understand our problem better. Talking it out just makes it a little easier. Talking to ourselves in our own heads doesn’t always work out so well. We talk to our friends sometimes, but they’re all idiots anyway so what’s the point? Besides, they start saying the same dumb things you say to them. Of course, we can always turn to the secret audiences in our journals, like I’m doing at this very moment — those imaginary people who might read this stuff someday and understand, or at least find it interesting. The point is, this old beat up leather bound journal is probably the closest thing to a listener that a lot of us kids are gonna find. There’s a word for your vocabulary lists. Listener. Pretty basic stuff. You just gotta open your ears and shut your mouth. We’ll do the rest. We’ll ask for your opinion if we want it. We’ll ask what you would do in the same situation if we want to know. Most importantly, don’t try to explain our problem back to us. You’re wrong. You weren’t listening very carefully. You were mostly trying to think up a solution, so you missed a lot. Also. When we talk to you about stuff, don’t be so uptight about it. Loosen up a little. You get all heavy and it makes it a lot harder for us to get it out, sort of like trying to take a piss after a movie with a bunch of guys all piled around the urinals so uptight that they can’t get the flow to start, and just the tension in the air makes it hard for you to get your own flow going. I guess what I’m trying to say here is this: when we end up in your office cuz we got sent out of class, or when we’re just mixed up inside, what we need is a toilet that our problems can splash around in. Not, and I repeat not, a vast emptiness of your opinions, coercion or advice.

 

About the Author

Kyle Weaver

Kyle wrote his first draft of this book as a young adult, then went on to serve as an educator and school developer. One of the public programs that he co-created received the award for “Best Charter School of the Year” in California. He is an avid hiker, daydreamer and thinker, and finds deep fulfillment in collaborating with others.