Emancipation Proclamation

The True Black History

by James C. Rollins

 

Book Details

EMANCIPATION PROCLAMATION THE TRUE BLACK HISTORY

The journey from the valley of darkness by African slaves in 1619, to the mountain top in 2008 with the election of African American Barak Obama, President of the United States

EMANCIPATION PROCLAMATION THE TRUE BLACK HISTORY The journey from the valley of darkness by African slaves in 1619, to the mountain top in 2008 with the election of African American Barack Obama, President of the United States The journey from the valley of darkness by African slaves in 1619, to the mountain top in 2008 with the election of African American Barack Obama, President of the United States… African Americans searching for the African roots of their culture should begin by understanding that only about five percent of between 11 and 12 million enslaved Africans were brought to North America or the United States. By 1619 the first African indentured servants arrived in the American colonies. The indentured servant was not a slave; they were under contract to provide service, over some time, after which they were set free. “What an interesting book! This book is well written while covering such a wide variety of topics that each entry is interesting and enlightening. There was an excellent job of covering a large period before the EMANCIPATION PROCLAMATION and after many in a clear and concise manner. It definitely gives the readers some food for thought, and they’ll still be thinking about this book and its revelations long after they’ve read the last page.” Author of the controversial book The Curse of Willie Lynch: How social engineering in the year 1712 continues to affect African Americans today.

 

Book Excerpt

Product Description The journey from the valley of darkness by African slaves in 1619, to the mountain top in 2008 with the election of African American Barack Obama, President of the United States By 1619 the first African indentured servants arrived in the American colonies. The indentured servant was not a slave; they were under contract to provide service, over some time, after which they were set free. This explained free Blacks in the northern states while slavery existed in the south at the same time. The first slaves were brought into New Amsterdam (later, New York City). By 1690, every colony had slaves. What’s in a name? Initially, African slaves were identified as (NEGROES Spanish for black). After the (Emancipation Proclamation, newly freed slaves were called NIGGERS by KKK and others. Until the early twentieth century freed slaves were referred to as( COLOREDS or NEGROES). During the twentieth century struggle for identity, they referred to themselves as (BLACK AMERICANS). Currently, descendants of ex-slaves from Africa identify themselves as (AFRICAN AMERICAN). What’s in a name……. What an interesting book! This book is well written while covering such a wide variety of topics that each entry is interesting and enlightening. There was an excellent job of covering a considerable period before the EMANCIPATION PROCLAMATION and after many in a clear and concise manner. It definitely gives the readers some food for thought, and they’ll still be thinking about this book and its revelations long after they’ve read the last page.

 

About the Author

James C. Rollins

James C. Rollins is a native of Washington, D.C. who is currently residing in Fort Washington, Maryland. He served in the United States Air Force from 1961-1965, later attending Antioch University where he pursued a Bachelor of Science in Business administration. He retired from the District of Columbia Government in 1995.