What

and stories passed on by ancestors

by Roger C. Elliott

What
Pinterest

What

and stories passed on by ancestors

by Roger C. Elliott

Published Nov 24, 2009
162 Pages
Genre: BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY / Personal Memoirs



 

Book Details

Can Ancestry and Genealogy Research Cultivate Motivation?

“With tears in their eyes, people tell me that after reading my manuscript they know they just have to write down so-and-so’s stories... ‘Now I know I just have to.’”

Although times were tough for Elliott, he says he doesn’t remember feeling that he was poor. “Up until I was about nine, our living conditions were closer to those who lived in the forties.”

Always a fan of writer Earl Hamner, Elliott writes about his feelings and experiences growing up. His parents and grandparents were all born in the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains in and around Sandy Hook, Kentucky, but left there before he was born. “Since I wasn’t born until they all lived in Southern Indiana, I wanted to know more about why they left Elliott County, Kentucky. --They all spoke of it so affectionately” He encourages others to write down memories and stories as he says: “Like our loved ones, these stories will also fade if not preserved.”

He writes for the people who would like to spend more time in the hammock or lawn chair. He wants readers to rekindle the passion for home made ice cream and family storytelling sessions. Likewise, he writes light-hearted stories for those who want to achieve inner peace. His stories offer a peaceful refuge from day-to-day annoyances.

For those who still love The Walton’s television shows and other Earl Hamner stories about life growing up, Elliott offers them some reading that will fill some of their voids.

Click HERE to purchace this book at Barnes and Noble.

 

Book Excerpt

I noted the circular Mets insignia that Dad had so candidly placed on the door's glass so many years ago. I wondered why anyone would put a baseball logo on the front door, but Dad often put things in the most peculiar places. A kind of knack he had, I guess. It was a pathetically humorous way to put his mark on the world. I then turned the time-worn knob slowly and actually had to lift up on the knob with both hands to separate the door from the years of being shut. It finally opened freely and simply to a dark living room. To the left it sloped a little downward to where the chimney still stood. It always did, I recalled. The opening to where the stovepipe once attached so perfectly to the painted brick was drooling mildewed soot...The bricks were hanging as if they were merely there because the paint and soot somehow held them together.

 

About the Author

Roger C. Elliott

Roger C. Elliott enjoys writing comfortable descriptive prose. He is married to Jeanette Renn Elliott. The family lives in Indiana with their two daughters: Alyssa and Lindsey. Elliott has taught at NE Dubois High School for twenty-three years. He and his wife met while attending the University of Evansville where they both received their Bachelor’s Degrees. Elliott received his M.A. from Nova Southeastern University.

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