Prayers of God

by Robert Mottley

 

Book Details

WOULD EMPATHY FOR HUMANS EVER COMPEL GOD TO PRAY? IF SO, TO WHOM AND FOR WHAT?


In almost every religion sustained by fear-mongering, shamans dissuade their faithful sheep from contemplating the countenance of whatever deity they worship, citing abiding damnation as a well-deserved punishment for anyone who is reckless enough to do so. Exodus 33:20-23 suggests an alternative, albeit one that divinity students are advised never to quote publicly. The Hebrews’ Lord tells Moses that “while my glory passeth by, I will cover thee with my hand. And I will take away my hand and thou shall see my back parts, but my face shall not be seen.” Yet all caveats about viewing either end of a divine construct seem one-sided. Who warns God about looking too closely at humankind? This novel, a mosaic tapestry in which timelines and genres interweave, suggests how a modern-era deity would cope with the trauma surely induced by such exposure. According to its author, Prayers of God developed from “an odd trinity of catalysts: Rabelais, Martin Luther and Wikipedia.”

“Terrific, superbly paced, pitch-perfect, wonderful in so many ways.” - William John Kennedy, professor of comparative literature, Cornell

 

About the Author

Robert Mottley

Robert Mottley worked for trade publications in New York City for many years. He compiled and edited The Best of Marya Mannes, an anthology of essays by a pioneering media commentator.

Information about Omniscient Neutral Intelligence, publisher of this precursory edition, can be found in Insert 12, “Sky and Sea.”